Category Archives: Isaiah

“I Am He”

How does God identify himself, and why is that important? The 101 Bible Study meeting on August 23 looks to Isaiah 41 for answers.

“The emphasis on water and trees had also been found in the account of Eden in Gene­sis 3. Through the en­trance of sin into the world, however, the garden was forfeited, and man entered a world where thorns and this­tles would grow and he would labor by the sweat of his brow. In picturing the fu­ture age of blessing, the es­chatalogical period when restoration will occur, Isaiah uses the combined figures of water and trees. It is as though a bit of heaven had come down to earth; and, in­deed, those who one day will be blessed of these rivers and these trees are in the heavenlies in Christ Je­sus.” (E. J. Young, Com­mentary on Isaiah, Vol. 3, p.95).

“This verse [Isaiah 41:22] il­lustrates the true nature of Christian apologetics. False­hood is here placed upon the defensive; it is com­manded in the name of the God of Israel to defend its cause and to out its justifica­tion for existence. There are difficulties in the acceptance of Christianity, but the Chris­tian need not be expected to answer every difficulty. Rather, he must challenge the very right of unbelief to a hearing. The cause of God is best defended by means of a challenging offensive such as is here offered.” (E. J. Young, Com­mentary on Isaiah, Vol. 3, p.98).

The Comfort of God’s Glory

“The immediate context of Isa. 40:3 is a good example of how in­extricably linked Isaiah’s restora­tion prophecies are with ideas of reconciliation to and acceptance by God.” (G. K. Beale, A New Tes­tament Biblical Theology, p. 549).

“God will again appear among men. This time, how­ever, it will be an eschato­logical coming, a revelation of the glory of God that will display itself in His salva­tion.” (E. J. Young, Com­mentary on Isaiah, Vol. 3, p.30).

The next 101 Bible Study, meeting Friday, June 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Astoria area, focuses on Isaiah 40. You are invited! Call 971/238-6101 for location.

The Gift of Life!

“Read through Hezekiah’s song of praise carefully. The fragility of life comes out clearly. But this song also deals with redemption–the redemption that deals first of all with forgiveness. ‘Thou by th love hast brought me back from the pit of destruc­tion; for thou hast cast all my sins behind thee.’ (38:17 NEB). Now Hezekiah can af­firm life again–in the service of the Lord, living a life full of salvation!” (C. Vanderwaal, Search the Scriptures, Vol. 5, p. 36).

“The mercy of God would not be re­moved during Hezekiah’s lifetime. Thus the chapter closes on a note that reveals the goodness of God. Yet the enemy is on the horizon. The power of Mesopotamia, the representative of the worldwide kingdom of man, is growing stronger and stronger and at the appointed time will strike against the little kingdom of Judah. . . . What about the future fortunes of the people of God? What ultimate comfort can be given to ‘my people’? The answer to these questions is reserved for the chapters that follow.” (E. J. Young, The Book of Isaiah, Vol. 2, p. 539).

The next 101 Bible Study, meeting Friday, June 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Astoria area, focuses on Isaiah 40. You are invited! Call 971/238-6101 for location.

Why Is God Gracious?

“Hezekiah made an appeal to the honor of the Lord in His grace toward His people. He wrestled in faith, and his prayer came before the Lord’s throne. He was the intercessor for his people. As such he was a type of he Christ, who is always interceding on behalf of his people. Through the Christ, this spirit of prayer was in Hezekiah,and for the sake of the Christ, the Lord heard.” (S. G. De Graaf, Promise and Deliverance, Vol. 2, p. 375).

“Surrounded by poetry on ei­ther side, Isaiah 36–39 is a narrative bridge that links chapters 1–35 with 40–66. Isaiah previously proclaimed that God would judge Is­rael’s enemies and save those who trust him. Can God be trusted to do this? In chapters 36–39, God acts concretely in history to res­cue his people from attack, answering this question in the affirmative. This section also provides the context for chapters 40–55 as Isaiah tells Hezekiah that the na­tion is doomed to exile in Babylon.” (Drew Hunter, Isa­iah: A 12 Week Study, page 51).

The next 101 Bible Study, meeting Friday, June 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Astoria area, focuses on Isaiah 40. You are invited! Call 971/238-6101 for location.