Category Archives: Isaiah

The Comfort of God’s Glory

“The immediate context of Isa. 40:3 is a good example of how in­extricably linked Isaiah’s restora­tion prophecies are with ideas of reconciliation to and acceptance by God.” (G. K. Beale, A New Tes­tament Biblical Theology, p. 549).

“God will again appear among men. This time, how­ever, it will be an eschato­logical coming, a revelation of the glory of God that will display itself in His salva­tion.” (E. J. Young, Com­mentary on Isaiah, Vol. 3, p.30).

The next 101 Bible Study, meeting Friday, June 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Astoria area, focuses on Isaiah 40. You are invited! Call 971/238-6101 for location.

The Gift of Life!

“Read through Hezekiah’s song of praise carefully. The fragility of life comes out clearly. But this song also deals with redemption–the redemption that deals first of all with forgiveness. ‘Thou by th love hast brought me back from the pit of destruc­tion; for thou hast cast all my sins behind thee.’ (38:17 NEB). Now Hezekiah can af­firm life again–in the service of the Lord, living a life full of salvation!” (C. Vanderwaal, Search the Scriptures, Vol. 5, p. 36).

“The mercy of God would not be re­moved during Hezekiah’s lifetime. Thus the chapter closes on a note that reveals the goodness of God. Yet the enemy is on the horizon. The power of Mesopotamia, the representative of the worldwide kingdom of man, is growing stronger and stronger and at the appointed time will strike against the little kingdom of Judah. . . . What about the future fortunes of the people of God? What ultimate comfort can be given to ‘my people’? The answer to these questions is reserved for the chapters that follow.” (E. J. Young, The Book of Isaiah, Vol. 2, p. 539).

The next 101 Bible Study, meeting Friday, June 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Astoria area, focuses on Isaiah 40. You are invited! Call 971/238-6101 for location.

Why Is God Gracious?

“Hezekiah made an appeal to the honor of the Lord in His grace toward His people. He wrestled in faith, and his prayer came before the Lord’s throne. He was the intercessor for his people. As such he was a type of he Christ, who is always interceding on behalf of his people. Through the Christ, this spirit of prayer was in Hezekiah,and for the sake of the Christ, the Lord heard.” (S. G. De Graaf, Promise and Deliverance, Vol. 2, p. 375).

“Surrounded by poetry on ei­ther side, Isaiah 36–39 is a narrative bridge that links chapters 1–35 with 40–66. Isaiah previously proclaimed that God would judge Is­rael’s enemies and save those who trust him. Can God be trusted to do this? In chapters 36–39, God acts concretely in history to res­cue his people from attack, answering this question in the affirmative. This section also provides the context for chapters 40–55 as Isaiah tells Hezekiah that the na­tion is doomed to exile in Babylon.” (Drew Hunter, Isa­iah: A 12 Week Study, page 51).

The next 101 Bible Study, meeting Friday, June 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Astoria area, focuses on Isaiah 40. You are invited! Call 971/238-6101 for location.

Your God Will Come!

What does it mean when your God comes? Is it something to dread? Something to rejoice in? Isaiah 34 & 35 both speak of God coming.

“[T]he physical and spiritual curses of the fall are starting to be taken away by Jesus. The healings were signs of the inbreaking new creation, which were not the complete healing of peo­ple’s bodies, since they would still die due to effects of the fall. Nevertheless, these wonders foreshadowed Jesus’ own complete healing in resurrection and the time when his followers will be completely healed.” (G. K. Beale, A New Testament Biblical The­ology, p. 569).

The next 101 Bible Study, meeting Friday, June 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Astoria area, focuses on Isaiah 40. You are invited! Call 971/238-6101 for location.

A Sealed Book and Talking Pots

Isaiah 29 includes references to a book or scroll that is sealed and thus unreadable, and to a pot that talks back to the potter.

“The point of this chapter [of Beale’s book] has been to underscore that, on the one hand, trust in idols ‘formed’ by humans results in spiritual blindness and deafness, as a reflection of of the idols themselves. It is idolatry that leads to all other sins committed by humans. On the other hand, trust in God as the only legitimate ‘former’ of images results in humans being ‘formed’ into something that is unique­ly able to reflect God’s glorious image. Being re-created in God’s image leads to increasing righteousness.” (G. K. Beale, A New Testament Biblical The­ology, p. 380).

“This is perhaps as sad a picture as is to be found anywhere in the Old Testa­ment. When one considers all the manifold and rich gifts that the gracious God had given to this people; when one reflects that it was His design to make of this peo­ple a ‘kingdom of priests and a holy nation,’ and then reads of the rebellion and apostasy that characterized the nation, one can but won­der at the goodness and pa­tience of God. Yet God’s pur­poses were not frustrated.” (E. J. Young, The Book of Isaiah, Vol. 2, p. 318, on Isa­iah 29:12).

The next 101 Bible Study, meeting Friday, June 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Astoria area, focuses on Isaiah 40. You are invited! Call 971/238-6101 for location.

Wailing Ships and the Lord’s Purpose

“As Tyre’s own colonies had once stood in relationship to herself and to the sanctuary that was in her midst, so now she will stand in relation to the Temple of the true God. . . . It is the same thought that we find expressed elsewhere in Scripture; ‘The kings of Tarshish and of the isles shall bring presents,: the kings of Sheba and Seba shall offer gifts’ (Ps. 72:10)Such gifts were really brought to the Lord himself, and we may see a true fulfill­ment of the prophecy, though not an exhaustive one, in the action of the wise men bringing gifts to Jesus.” (E. J. Young, The Book of Isaiah, Vol. 2, pp. 141–142).

“[T]he judgment of Tyre in­cludes overturning her mer­chants because they had become proud about their economic achievements and consequent power: ‘The Lord of hosts has purposed to bring down all the pride of the glorious ones and to dis­grace every glorious thing on the earth’ (Isa. 23:9 LXX). . . . Tyre’s economic self-idolatry was the cause of its eventual judgment. . . . The point is that the chief purpose of humanity, ac­cording to the Apocalypse, is to glorify God and to enjoy him, not to glorify oneself and enjoy one’s own achievements.” (G. K. Beale, The Book of Revelation, NIGTC, pp. 921–922).

The next 101 Bible Study, meeting Friday, June 21, at 6:30 p.m. in the Astoria area, focuses on Isaiah 40. You are invited! Call 971/238-6101 for location.

 

Pegs and Keys

key_11334cThe 101 Bible Study focuses on Isaiah 22.

“Grief came to [Isaiah]. . . because the inhabitants of Jerusalem, who should have acted as a holy priest­hood, had, by their sin and their generally care­less attitude, them­selves been the cause of the city’s downfall. When calamity comes to the Church, every Christian must feel that calamity as though it were his own. The hymn writer has accu­rately stated the mat­ter:

For her my tears shall fall,
     For her my prayers ascend;
To her my cares and toils be giv­en,
     Till toils and cares shall end.”

(E. J. Young, The Book of Isaiah, Vol. 2, p. 92).

“When we think of the power of the key, we are reminded immediately of what Christ said to Peter: ‘I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven’ (Mat. 16:19). Christ is ‘the true one, who has the key of David, who opens and no one shall shut, who shuts and no one opens’ (Rev. 3:7). Through the of­fices, Christ allows His church to serve as steward. Isn’t this an awesome policy for a world writhing in pain?” (C. Vanderwaal, Search the Scriptures, Vol. 5, p. 27).