Category Archives: Gaffin

Faith Working Through Love

“The gospel removes an abso­lute law-gospel antithesis in the life of the believer. How so? Briefly, apart form the gospel and outside of Christ, the law is my enemy and condemns me. Why? Because God is my enemy and condemns me. But with the gospel and in Christ, united to him by faith, the law is no longer my enemy but my friend. Why Because now God is no longer my enemy but my friend, and the law, his will—the law in its moral core, as reflective of his character and of concerns eternally inherent in his own person and so of what pleases him—is now my friendly guide for life in fellowship with God.” (Richard B. Gaffin, Jr. By Faith, Not by Sight, pages 117–118).

Galatians 5:1–15 is the passage we are looking at in the Sunday afternoon Bible study at Trinity Presbyterian Church.

Greetings — in Christ

saints“In Romans 16:7 Paul mentions those who ‘were in Christ be­fore me’ or ‘before I was.’ Here Paul, speaking autobiographi­cally but surely representatively of all Christians, brings into view a before and after of being ‘in Christ’ that points to a critical transition.” (Richard B. Gaffin, Jr., By Faith, Not By Sight, p. 37).

“We may not tone down the unity of the church. This comes to expression repeat­edly in Paul (cf. 11:16-24; Eph. 2:16, 18-22; 4:2-16). But Paul is also jealous to maintain that in every in­stance where the saints are gathered together in Christ’s name in accordance with his institution, there the church of Christ is (cf. vs.5).” (John Murray, The Epistle to the Romans, Vol. 2, p. 233).

The Powerful Spirit Working in Your Life

Ayear1002ec“The way to be filled with the Spirit is to let God’s word dwell in you richly. We will be more and more filled with the Spirit as we are more and more filled with Scrip­ture.” (Richard B. Gaffin, Jr., The Work of the Holy Spirit, p. 31).

“. . . the Scriptures are espe­cially serviceable for this pur­pose — to raise up those who are prepared by patience, and strengthened by consolations, to the hope of eternal life, and to keep them in the contempla­tion of it.” (John Calvin, Com­mentary on the Epistle to the Romans, at Rom. 15:4).

 

The Truth and the Triumph of the Resurrection

risen3cIn Christ’s resurrection the end-time resurrec­tion-harvest becomes visible, a visible reality.”

In Paul there is no more important conclusion about the Christian life, nothing about its struc­ture that is more basic than this: the Christian life in its entirety is to be subsumed under the category of resurrection. Pointedly, the Christian life is resurrection-life.” (Richard B. Gaffin, Jr., By Faith, Not By Sight: Paul and the Order of Salvation, pp. 60 and 68).

 

Jesus says, ‘I lay down my life, in order that I may take it again’. Here we are apprised of a relationship that exists between His death and resurrection that too often escapes our attention. It is that the laying down of His life was to the end that He might take it again, that His death was to the end of His resur­rection. . . . The death of Christ is not an end in itself. It is subordinate to a great purpose that can be achieved only through resurrection.” (John Murray, “Who Raised Up Je­sus?” The Westmin­ster Theological Journal, May 1941, pp. 119-120).

From the Reflection for Trinity Presbyterian Church, OPC